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Wind energy still a dream

If Cambridge takes advantage of a grant program that rewards municipalities for using green energy, it could more than double the amount of renewable energy it's able to purchase.

That was just one tidbit to come out of a meeting held last week on wind energy. Whether the city will erect a wind turbine, however, as proposed by Councilor Henrietta Davis, is still unclear.

The discussion focused mostly on how Cambridge could best utilize its resources to reach its goal of being 20 percent green by 2010. Currently the city is about four percent green.

It accomplishes part of that by buying Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) from a company called Trans Canada. For $27,000 a year, the city buys one percent of its renewable energy in RECs.

RECs allow a city or person to claim they're green even if they aren't directly receiving energy from a green source. The monetary contribution allows the claim because the city or person purchasing it is helping to support the renewable energy industry.

Because Trans Canada is not certified by the Massachusetts Technology Collaboration, which operates a matching grant program, Cambridge can't take advantage of the program. If Trans Canada becomes certified, however, Cambridge could be eligible for $20,000 in grant funds.

This would allow the city to get more RECs for the money it's budgeted. Davis has asked City Manager Bob Healy to... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

That was just one tidbit to come out of a meeting held last week on wind energy. Whether the city will erect a wind turbine, however, as proposed by Councilor Henrietta Davis, is still unclear.
 
The discussion focused mostly on how Cambridge could best utilize its resources to reach its goal of being 20 percent green by 2010. Currently the city is about four percent green.
 
It accomplishes part of that by buying Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) from a company called Trans Canada. For $27,000 a year, the city buys one percent of its renewable energy in RECs.
 
RECs allow a city or person to claim they're green even if they aren't directly receiving energy from a green source. The monetary contribution allows the claim because the city or person purchasing it is helping to support the renewable energy industry.
 
Because Trans Canada is not certified by the Massachusetts Technology Collaboration, which operates a matching grant program, Cambridge can't take advantage of the program. If Trans Canada becomes certified, however, Cambridge could be eligible for $20,000 in grant funds.
 
This would allow the city to get more RECs for the money it's budgeted. Davis has asked City Manager Bob Healy to re-examine Cambridge's contract with Trans Canada.


Source: http://www2.townonline.com/...

MAY 11 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/2577-wind-energy-still-a-dream
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