Article

REF Welcomes Prospect of Change To Renewables Obligation

The Renewable Energy Foundation has consistently argued that the current subsidy system is resulting in an unbalanced deployment of renewables and will neither produce a healthy long term future for this sector, nor an economically compelling example of low carbon energy generation.

In response to a question yesterday from the Rt. Hon. Mark Lancaster MP (North-East Milton Keynes, Conservative) the Energy Minister, the Rt. Hon Malcolm Wicks MP yesterday confirmed that the forthcoming Energy Review would address the fact that the Renewables Obligation has focused on one technology to the detriment of others. The Minister said:

“Yes, I agree that the renewables obligation, despite its strengths, which have brought forward much renewable energy, could appear to be a blunt instrument and certainly seems to be favouring one technology—the wind farm. Within the review, we are therefore considering the issue that the hon. Gentleman raises.”

The Renewable Energy Foundation has consistently argued that the current subsidy system is resulting in an unbalanced deployment of renewables and will neither produce a healthy long term future for this sector, nor an economically compelling example of low carbon energy generation.


Dr John Constable, Director of Policy and Research said:

“This Ministerial indication that the Obligation will be revised to offer more to technologies which themselves have more to offer is very welcome, and gives investors an incentive to plan for the long term. It’s extremely good news for the broader renewables sector.”


Mr Mark Lancaster said:

“This is really about getting value for money for the consumer. The Renewables Obligation... [truncated due to possible copyright]  
In response to a question yesterday from the Rt. Hon. Mark Lancaster MP (North-East Milton Keynes, Conservative) the Energy Minister, the Rt. Hon Malcolm Wicks MP yesterday confirmed that the forthcoming Energy Review would address the fact that the Renewables Obligation has focused on one technology to the detriment of others. The Minister said:

 “Yes, I agree that the renewables obligation, despite its strengths, which have brought forward much renewable energy, could appear to be a blunt instrument and certainly seems to be favouring one technology—the wind farm. Within the review, we are therefore considering the issue that the hon. Gentleman raises.”

 The Renewable Energy Foundation has consistently argued that the current subsidy system is resulting in an unbalanced deployment of renewables and will neither produce a healthy long term future for this sector, nor an economically compelling example of low carbon energy generation.


Dr John Constable, Director of Policy and Research said:

“This Ministerial indication that the Obligation will be revised to offer more to technologies which themselves have more to offer is very welcome, and gives investors an incentive to plan for the long term. It’s extremely good news for the broader renewables sector.”


Mr Mark Lancaster said:

“This is really about getting value for money for the consumer. The Renewables Obligation is a very expensive subsidy, drawn indirectly from our electricity bills, and we need to make sure that we get a good return for that expenditure, with a balanced and diverse portfolio of renewables. At the moment that really isn’t the case. The changes which the Minister hinted at just can’t come soon enough.”


For further information please contact Margareta Stanley on 020 7930 3636 / 07968 049 832 email  press@ref.org.uk or visit the website at www.ref.org.uk.


To contact Mr Mark Lancaster telephone Mr Peter Geary on 07774 939 404


Notes to Editors

House of Commons - Oral Answers Date published: 05 May 2006 Energy Supplies

To read online:



Q. Mr. Lancaster

Increasing the use of renewable energy sources is the best way of increasing diversity in the UK's energy supply. But does the Minister agree that we need to reconsider the renewables obligation, which focuses on wind power to the detriment of other emerging technologies?


A. Malcolm Wicks

Yes, I agree that the renewables obligation, despite its strengths, which have brought forward much renewable energy, could appear to be a blunt instrument and certainly seems to be favouring one technology—the wind farm. Within the review, we are therefore considering the issue that the hon. Gentleman raises. He refers to it as the best way of promoting a diversity of supply. We have a target that 10 per cent. of our electricity should come from renewables by the end of this decade, and what we currently call an aspiration of 20 per cent. by 2020. That is one way, but there are other ways of promoting such diversity.



Source: link missing! please notify us

MAY 8 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/2554-ref-welcomes-prospect-of-change-to-renewables-obligation
back to top