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Cape Wind: State official says it would harm the area

State historical preservation officer Brona Simon spoke out against the Cape Wind turbine project proposed for Nantucket Sound during a hearing in Barnstable on Monday. She noted that the project is 24 to 25 square miles. "You can see the concern we have with the adverse effects of the proposal," she said. "The visual element will alter the setting outside the character of the historic properties."

BARNSTABLE - State historical preservation officer Brona Simon spoke out against the Cape Wind turbine project proposed for Nantucket Sound during a hearing in Barnstable on Monday.

She noted that the project, which would include 130 giant wind turbines, is 24 to 25 square miles.

"You can see the concern we have with the adverse effects of the proposal," she said. "The visual element will alter the setting outside the character of the historic properties."

Simon, head of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, noted that since the sound isn't yet listed as a National Historic Landmark, the National Park Service determined the effects would be indirect, but she noted the sound was important to both the Wampanoag tribes and European settlers.

"In addition, there are underwater cultural resources likely to be imperiled by construction," she said. "(It is an area) likely to have been utilized by native American ancestors."

Simon said alternative sites have been suggested - such as south of Martha's Vineyard.

"In the years since (2001), deep-water wind technology has made considerable progress," she said.

The federal Advisory Council on Historic... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

BARNSTABLE - State historical preservation officer Brona Simon spoke out against the Cape Wind turbine project proposed for Nantucket Sound during a hearing in Barnstable on Monday.

She noted that the project, which would include 130 giant wind turbines, is 24 to 25 square miles.

"You can see the concern we have with the adverse effects of the proposal," she said. "The visual element will alter the setting outside the character of the historic properties."

Simon, head of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, noted that since the sound isn't yet listed as a National Historic Landmark, the National Park Service determined the effects would be indirect, but she noted the sound was important to both the Wampanoag tribes and European settlers.

"In addition, there are underwater cultural resources likely to be imperiled by construction," she said. "(It is an area) likely to have been utilized by native American ancestors."

Simon said alternative sites have been suggested - such as south of Martha's Vineyard.

"In the years since (2001), deep-water wind technology has made considerable progress," she said.

The federal Advisory Council on Historic Preservation held Monday's meeting in Barnstable to collect comments about the effects of the wind farm.

That agency will send the comments to Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar before April 14, and he'll determine whether the Minerals Management Service will issue the project a permit for development in federal waters.

"Cape Wind has been sensitive to historic and cultural concerns through nine years of this process," Cape Wind spokesman Mark Rodgers told the panel. "The only impacts to historic properties identified there previously are visual. The impacts are minimal only, and the National Park Service has determined Cape Wind has no direct adverse historical impact."


Source: http://www.patriotledger.co...

MAR 24 2010
http://www.windaction.org/posts/25338-cape-wind-state-official-says-it-would-harm-the-area
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