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Historic officer: Cape Wind impact 'unparalled' on historic sites

Speaking publicly for the first time on the subject, the Massachusetts Historic Preservation Officer told a federal panel today that impacts from the proposed Nantucket Sound wind farm on Native American and other historic sites were "unparalleled" in the state's history.

Speaking publicly for the first time on the subject, the Massachusetts Historic Preservation Officer told a federal panel today that impacts from the proposed Nantucket Sound wind farm on Native American and other historic sites were "unparalleled" in the state's history.

Brona Simon's opinion that Nantucket Sound should be listed on the National Register of Historic Places has prompted a controversy that will culminate in a final decision on the project by U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar in April. A five-member Advisory Council on Historic Preservation panel that will advise Salazar listened to Simon and other proponents and opponents of the project in a Cape Cod Community College that was attended by about 150 people.

"The magnitude is unparalleled in Massachusetts,'' Simon told the five-member panel at Cape Cod Community College, noting the 130 turbines will cover an area about 25 square miles.

Simon said the next biggest project her office has reviewed was a highway in Central Massachusetts that encompassed 3.9 square miles. "You can see the concern we have about the adverse affects of the project." Her comments were met with loud applause.

While the... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Speaking publicly for the first time on the subject, the Massachusetts Historic Preservation Officer told a federal panel today that impacts from the proposed Nantucket Sound wind farm on Native American and other historic sites were "unparalleled" in the state's history.

Brona Simon's opinion that Nantucket Sound should be listed on the National Register of Historic Places has prompted a controversy that will culminate in a final decision on the project by U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar in April. A five-member Advisory Council on Historic Preservation panel that will advise Salazar listened to Simon and other proponents and opponents of the project in a Cape Cod Community College that was attended by about 150 people.

"The magnitude is unparalleled in Massachusetts,'' Simon told the five-member panel at Cape Cod Community College, noting the 130 turbines will cover an area about 25 square miles.

Simon said the next biggest project her office has reviewed was a highway in Central Massachusetts that encompassed 3.9 square miles. "You can see the concern we have about the adverse affects of the project." Her comments were met with loud applause.

While the hearing yesterday was officially to hear comments on impacts to all historic properties from the130-turbine Cape Wind project, it largely pivoted on the Native American claims. Two Wampanoag tribes say they need an unobstructed view of Nantucket Sound to carry out spiritual sun greetings and that the waterway's seabed - once exposed land thousands of years ago - is sacred ancestral land that would be disturbed by turbines.

The Minerals Management Service disagreed with Simon, but the National Park Service agreed, saying the 560-square mile sound was eligible to be listed. The result is today's hearing before Salazar's decision. He does not have do what the panel decides - their role is strictly advisory.

Barbara Hill, head of Clean Power Now, a support group for the project said there was ample consultation with historic groups and the attempt was another in a long line of opposition tactics.

"This project is a signal event of this nation,'' said Hill, who was booed by some members of audience.

The Cape Wind project has undergone nine years of environmental review.


Source: http://www.boston.com/lifes...

MAR 22 2010
http://www.windaction.org/posts/25293-historic-officer-cape-wind-impact-unparalled-on-historic-sites
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