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Cape Wind ruling held up for historical review

Despite high-profile Washington meetings and a junket to the Cape and Martha’s Vineyard last month, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar has failed to resolve a dispute about Cape Wind’s potential impact on the historical preservation of Nantucket Sound. Instead, Salazar kicked the matter to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.

Despite high-profile Washington meetings and a junket to the Cape and Martha’s Vineyard last month, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar has failed to resolve a dispute about Cape Wind’s potential impact on the historical preservation of Nantucket Sound.

Instead, Salazar kicked the matter to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, which will now start a 45-day public comment period - similar to the comment period the feds just held.

In a statement yesterday that doesn’t shed any light on what Salazar’s ultimate decision will be, the interior secretary said Cape Wind’s developer and the Native American tribes that oppose the project could not agree on a settlement that would allow the proposed wind turbine farm in federal waters.

“It is clear to me that the consulting parties are not able to bridge their divides and reach agreement,” Salazar said.

Aquinnah Wampanoag official Bettina Washington said she wasn’t surprised that a compromise could not be reached.

“The project people said, ‘This is where we intend to build,’ and we said, ‘This is tribal cultural property,’ ” she said.

Cape Wind spokesman Mark... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Despite high-profile Washington meetings and a junket to the Cape and Martha’s Vineyard last month, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar has failed to resolve a dispute about Cape Wind’s potential impact on the historical preservation of Nantucket Sound.

Instead, Salazar kicked the matter to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, which will now start a 45-day public comment period - similar to the comment period the feds just held.

In a statement yesterday that doesn’t shed any light on what Salazar’s ultimate decision will be, the interior secretary said Cape Wind’s developer and the Native American tribes that oppose the project could not agree on a settlement that would allow the proposed wind turbine farm in federal waters.

“It is clear to me that the consulting parties are not able to bridge their divides and reach agreement,” Salazar said.

Aquinnah Wampanoag official Bettina Washington said she wasn’t surprised that a compromise could not be reached.

“The project people said, ‘This is where we intend to build,’ and we said, ‘This is tribal cultural property,’ ” she said.

Cape Wind spokesman Mark Rodgers said project supporters are confident “that when Secretary Salazar reviews the entire record on Cape Wind that he will conclude that the public benefits of jobs, cleaner air, greater energy independence and mitigation of climate change will outweigh any negative impacts, and that the project will be approved.”

After 45 days, the advisory panel will provide comments to Salazar, whose decision is key to whether the multi-billion dollar project will be built.

Cape Wind calls for 130 industrial-sized wind turbines on a 25-mile stretch of federal waters. Developer Jim Gordon has spent nine years trying to secure permits for what would be the nation’s first offshore wind power project.

Yesterday’s decision focused on a key portion of the Cape Wind debate. Two Native American tribes, who say the project will interfere with spiritual practices and ancestral burial grounds, say Nantucket Sound is a culturally significant property that should be shielded from development.


Source: http://news.bostonherald.co...

MAR 2 2010
http://www.windaction.org/posts/24878-cape-wind-ruling-held-up-for-historical-review
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