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Commissioners learn wind farm put on hold

Young County commissioners learned Monday that a proposed wind farm may be years away. ..."They're going to do it, but they're looking at two to four years down the road," Wiley said. "They put it out for bids for the electricity and got no bids. Another problem is where we're at, they can get the electricity, but they have no way to get it where it needs to be."

Young County commissioners learned Monday that a proposed wind farm may be years away.

Precinct 4 Commissioner Jimmy Wiley announced that BP Energy has delayed plans to construct a wind farm.

"They're going to do it, but they're looking at two to four years down the road," Wiley said. "They put it out for bids for the electricity and got no bids. Another problem is where we're at, they can get the electricity, but they have no way to get it where it needs to be."

Wiley said with no way to move the electricity, BP has no choice but to wait until new transmission lines are built.

Wiley said one project BP was working on recently got cut in half after construction began. At this point, the company has not announced plans to reduce the size of the Young County proposal.

"It's not good news, but it wasn't completely bad either," Wiley said.

The tax abatement commissioners agreed to with BP will expire at the end of 2010 if construction has not started. In order to get the desired tax breaks, BP would have to negotiate a new agreement with commissioners.

Commissioners voted unanimously to help Olney Hamilton Hospital purchase new defibrillators to replace units that are outdated and dangerous.

Anita... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Young County commissioners learned Monday that a proposed wind farm may be years away.

Precinct 4 Commissioner Jimmy Wiley announced that BP Energy has delayed plans to construct a wind farm.

"They're going to do it, but they're looking at two to four years down the road," Wiley said. "They put it out for bids for the electricity and got no bids. Another problem is where we're at, they can get the electricity, but they have no way to get it where it needs to be."

Wiley said with no way to move the electricity, BP has no choice but to wait until new transmission lines are built.

Wiley said one project BP was working on recently got cut in half after construction began. At this point, the company has not announced plans to reduce the size of the Young County proposal.

"It's not good news, but it wasn't completely bad either," Wiley said.

The tax abatement commissioners agreed to with BP will expire at the end of 2010 if construction has not started. In order to get the desired tax breaks, BP would have to negotiate a new agreement with commissioners.

Commissioners voted unanimously to help Olney Hamilton Hospital purchase new defibrillators to replace units that are outdated and dangerous.

Anita Palmer with the Hamilton Hospital Foundation explained that the hospital had applied for a grant with the Priddy Foundation that would pay for 40 percent of the cost. She proposed that the hospital, the foundation and the county pay 20 percent each.

"We currently have four defibrillators and none of them match. None of the leads match," Palmer said. "When EMS goes and picks up someone in cardiac arrest, they have to put leads on. When they get to the emergency room, they rip off the leads and put new leads on. When they get to the patient room, they have to do it again."

She said having to use three sets of leads is not only painful but dangerous.

"The main thing is patient safety," Palmer said. "If a patient is in cardiac arrest, they could die when the leads are off."

County Judge Stan Peavy III told Palmer the county could likely help now but warned her that future financial assistance is far from certain.

"Although I think we can help you out here, I'm worried about whether we'll be able to do it in the future," Peavy said.

Commissioners also voted unanimously to spend an extra $16,000 when replacing the boiler at the county courthouse to make sure the job was done properly.

Commissioners had previously agreed to use $57,576 from an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant to replace the boiler.

But what was left unanswered was how much extra money the county wanted to spend, especially when it came to removing asbestos in the boiler room and along the pipes.

Wes Blackwood with Carrier presented the county three options Monday.

The cheapest option - $80,480 - would put in a new boiler and remove only the asbestos needed to do the job.

The middle option - $93,160 - would put in a new boiler, remove the old boiler and remove asbestos from the area, including in the old boiler.

The final option - $96,860 - would do everything in option two and remove all the asbestos.

"It's not that far different from what we were looking at last time," Precinct 1 Commissioner John Hawkins said. "I think that's the cheapest we're ever going to get. This is something if you put it off, it's only going to cost more in the future.

"I'd make a motion we do it all, get the asbestos and the boiler out of there."

The motion passed unanimously.

Peavy pointed out that all the work would only cost the county $39,000 thanks to the grant funding.

"That's essentially one replacement of the tubes and boiler which is coming in a few years," he said.


Source: http://biz.grahamtexas.net/...

FEB 24 2010
http://www.windaction.org/posts/24784-commissioners-learn-wind-farm-put-on-hold
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