Article

More tribes join bid to derail Cape Wind

With the clock ticking on the Cape Wind decision, American Indian tribes across the nation are lining up in support of the Wampanoags. The San Carlos Apache Tribe of Arizona and the 25-tribe coalition known as the United South and Eastern Tribes Inc. have both asked U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to stop the controversial project.

With the clock ticking on the Cape Wind decision, American Indian tribes across the nation are lining up in support of the Wampanoags.

The San Carlos Apache Tribe of Arizona and the 25-tribe coalition known as the United South and Eastern Tribes Inc. have both asked U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to stop the controversial project.

"The Cape Winds (sic) wind farm project will forever change the physical integrity of the sacred site," the group said.

For nine years, power plant developer Jim Gordon has tried to obtain federal permits to build what could be the nation's first offshore wind farm.

His 130-turbine project, slated for 25 miles of federal waters in Nantucket Sound, is supported by many state officials and environmental groups.

But it has its share of critics.

The Wampanoag people of Aquinnah and Mashpee say the $1.6 billion development will disturb a tribal burial ground and interfere with religious rituals.

The argument has the support of the state's historic preservation office and the National Park Service, which both say the site could qualify as a tribal cultural area.

Two weeks ago, Salazar met... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

With the clock ticking on the Cape Wind decision, American Indian tribes across the nation are lining up in support of the Wampanoags.

The San Carlos Apache Tribe of Arizona and the 25-tribe coalition known as the United South and Eastern Tribes Inc. have both asked U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to stop the controversial project.

"The Cape Winds (sic) wind farm project will forever change the physical integrity of the sacred site," the group said.

For nine years, power plant developer Jim Gordon has tried to obtain federal permits to build what could be the nation's first offshore wind farm.

His 130-turbine project, slated for 25 miles of federal waters in Nantucket Sound, is supported by many state officials and environmental groups.

But it has its share of critics.

The Wampanoag people of Aquinnah and Mashpee say the $1.6 billion development will disturb a tribal burial ground and interfere with religious rituals.

The argument has the support of the state's historic preservation office and the National Park Service, which both say the site could qualify as a tribal cultural area.

Two weeks ago, Salazar met with Cape Wind stakeholders and promised a resolution by the end of April.


Source: http://www.bostonherald.com...

JAN 26 2010
http://www.windaction.org/posts/24322-more-tribes-join-bid-to-derail-cape-wind
back to top