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The New England Council and the New England Energy Alliance Outline Support for Nuclear Power in New England

If New England's nuclear energy plants had to be replaced by other non-emitting sources of electricity to meet the RGGI goals, the region would be looking at large-scale wind projects, with weather-dependent output, spread over some 650,000 acres of land or water at a cost of more than $10 billion.

BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--April 11, 2006--The New England Council and the New England Energy Alliance are urging energy policymakers to support the continued operation of the region's nuclear power plants. A report released today by the Council and the Alliance calls on policymakers to recognize the vital role of New England's nuclear power plants as low cost providers of efficient, reliable and clean electricity.

The report notes that New England's five nuclear energy plants provide about 26 percent of the region's electricity, which is equivalent to the electricity needed for all the residential households in Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire Vermont and Rhode Island combined.

"Since 1975, New England's electricity consumption has doubled to keep pace with New England's growing high tech economy. Even as the region becomes more energy efficient, peak electricity demand is projected to increase by approximately 15 percent over the next decade," noted James Brett, President and CEO, The New England Council. "But as no plants are under construction in New England, nuclear energy generation is essential to maintain a balance between supply and... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--April 11, 2006--The New England Council and the New England Energy Alliance are urging energy policymakers to support the continued operation of the region's nuclear power plants. A report released today by the Council and the Alliance calls on policymakers to recognize the vital role of New England's nuclear power plants as low cost providers of efficient, reliable and clean electricity.

The report notes that New England's five nuclear energy plants provide about 26 percent of the region's electricity, which is equivalent to the electricity needed for all the residential households in Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire Vermont and Rhode Island combined.

"Since 1975, New England's electricity consumption has doubled to keep pace with New England's growing high tech economy. Even as the region becomes more energy efficient, peak electricity demand is projected to increase by approximately 15 percent over the next decade," noted James Brett, President and CEO, The New England Council. "But as no plants are under construction in New England, nuclear energy generation is essential to maintain a balance between supply and demand. Maintaining existing nuclear facilities must be part of the region's future energy plan."

Carl Gustin, President, New England Energy Alliance, added that nuclear energy facilities are an important part of the energy mix in New England, which is facing challenges of adequate energy infrastructure.

"Nuclear energy is reliable, affordable and clean. The plants generally operate around the clock for more than 500 days before having to shut down to refuel and they produce the lowest-cost electricity. From an environmental perspective, they produce none of the gases or byproducts that contribute to smog, acid rain, and global warming," Gustin said.

The report entitled, "Nuclear Energy in New England: A Valuable & Dependable Source of Electricity," was prepared by Polestar Communications and Strategic Analysis, and notes that nuclear plants will play an important role in attaining greenhouse gas reductions goals such as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) in which four New England states are participating. If New England's nuclear energy plants had to be replaced by other non-emitting sources of electricity to meet the RGGI goals, the region would be looking at large-scale wind projects, with weather-dependent output, spread over some 650,000 acres of land or water at a cost of more than $10 billion.

"The cost of energy continues to be an issue of competitiveness for the business community in New England. Maintaining this energy source will be important to our continued economic success," Brett added.

The New England Council is an alliance of businesses, academic and health institutions, and public and private organizations formed to promote economic growth and a high quality of life in the region.

The New England Energy Alliance is a coalition of energy providers, business and trade organizations and others concerned about the future of energy supplies.


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APR 11 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/2121-the-new-england-council-and-the-new-england-energy-alliance-outline-support-for-nuclear-power-in-new-england
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