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Making Juhl the little wind farm that could

The wind-energy boom has been seeded by federal and state tax credits that generally are most beneficial for wealthy investors, partnerships and corporations who might have unrelated income to offset. The federal stimulus bill appears to allow the tax benefits to be claimed by such a taxable pool, increasing profits and dividends to a lot of smaller owners, said Lee Schafer, director of investment banking at Northland.

Eyebrows in the energy industry rose last month when retired Gen. Wesley Clark, a former commander of NATO forces in Europe and a one-time Democratic presidential candidate, joined the board of little Juhl Wind of Woodstock, Minn.

Juhl, founded by 35-year Minnesota wind pioneer Dan Juhl, went public last year, boasts a very modest market value of $40 million and is expected to achieve revenue this year approaching $12 million from developing and operating small wind farms in the Midwest in partnership with farmers and other community-based owners.

Juhl, Clark and Juhl President John Mitola, an engineer, lawyer and veteran utility executive, have spent a lot of time figuring out how they can keep the wind energy from becoming just the province of huge energy players such as utilities and energy conglomerates.

"Dan, on his own and without any silk-stocking investment bankers, managed to get about $200 million in wind farms going that are owned by farmers and other community members," Mitola said this week. "We've got [hundreds of millions more] in the pipeline. But we need capital."

Although the details won't be released in an investor prospectus before spring, Juhl is working with... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Eyebrows in the energy industry rose last month when retired Gen. Wesley Clark, a former commander of NATO forces in Europe and a one-time Democratic presidential candidate, joined the board of little Juhl Wind of Woodstock, Minn.

Juhl, founded by 35-year Minnesota wind pioneer Dan Juhl, went public last year, boasts a very modest market value of $40 million and is expected to achieve revenue this year approaching $12 million from developing and operating small wind farms in the Midwest in partnership with farmers and other community-based owners.

Juhl, Clark and Juhl President John Mitola, an engineer, lawyer and veteran utility executive, have spent a lot of time figuring out how they can keep the wind energy from becoming just the province of huge energy players such as utilities and energy conglomerates.

"Dan, on his own and without any silk-stocking investment bankers, managed to get about $200 million in wind farms going that are owned by farmers and other community members," Mitola said this week. "We've got [hundreds of millions more] in the pipeline. But we need capital."

Although the details won't be released in an investor prospectus before spring, Juhl is working with Northland Securities of Minneapolis on the first $100 million offering, or fund, that might function like an asset-pooled Real Estate Investment Trust. It would let individuals, communities, socially responsible investment funds and others invest in a Juhl portfolio of small-to-large wind farms.

The wind-energy boom has been seeded by federal and state tax credits that generally are most beneficial for wealthy investors, partnerships and corporations who might have unrelated income to offset. The federal stimulus bill appears to allow the tax benefits to be claimed by such a taxable pool, increasing profits and dividends to a lot of smaller owners, said Lee Schafer, director of investment banking at Northland.


Source: http://www.startribune.com/...

FEB 21 2009
http://www.windaction.org/posts/19183-making-juhl-the-little-wind-farm-that-could
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