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Portage couple awaiting court decision on turbine lawsuit

Jill Stull from Portage says her life and farm have turned upside down ever since some unwelcome neighbors moved in 2006. "We want the noise to stop. I want my husband to be able to sleep in our home," Stull said. The noise she's referring to is from the six turbines surrounding her 100-acre farm. At least once a week, Stull says she can hear and feel the turbines humming, and it's a sensation she says comes at irregular intervals.

While President-elect Barack Obama is looking to renewable energy to help get our economy back on track, our area is divided over whether that's a good idea.

Jill Stull from Portage says her life and farm have turned upside down ever since some unwelcome neighbors moved in 2006.

"We want the noise to stop. I want my husband to be able to sleep in our home," Stull said.

The noise she's referring to is from the six turbines surrounding her 100-acre farm. At least once a week, Stull says she can hear and feel the turbines humming, and it's a sensation she says comes at irregular intervals.

"It's not like a train [going] by your house every four o'clock and you get used to it," Stull explained. "Your brain can't get used to these tones and these vibrations."

In May, Stull and her husband Todd sued Gamesa Energy USA -- the wind farm's developers -- and Allegheny Ridge Wind Farm for creating a noise nuisance they say has broken township rules and affected their health.

WJAC News spoke with Gamesa, who declined to comment specifically about the ongoing case. However, spokesman Michael Peck told Reporter Carol Han that the company conducts numerous noise and environmental tests before breaking ground for a... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

While President-elect Barack Obama is looking to renewable energy to help get our economy back on track, our area is divided over whether that's a good idea.

Jill Stull from Portage says her life and farm have turned upside down ever since some unwelcome neighbors moved in 2006.

"We want the noise to stop. I want my husband to be able to sleep in our home," Stull said.

The noise she's referring to is from the six turbines surrounding her 100-acre farm. At least once a week, Stull says she can hear and feel the turbines humming, and it's a sensation she says comes at irregular intervals.

"It's not like a train [going] by your house every four o'clock and you get used to it," Stull explained. "Your brain can't get used to these tones and these vibrations."

In May, Stull and her husband Todd sued Gamesa Energy USA -- the wind farm's developers -- and Allegheny Ridge Wind Farm for creating a noise nuisance they say has broken township rules and affected their health.

WJAC News spoke with Gamesa, who declined to comment specifically about the ongoing case. However, spokesman Michael Peck told Reporter Carol Han that the company conducts numerous noise and environmental tests before breaking ground for a new wind farm.

"Gamesa we take everyone of these comments seriously," Peck said. "We do upwards of 16 different environmental surveys before we locate a turbine, and sighting can be done... so the noise issue could be mitigated."

In court, Gamesa is claiming all such precautions were made, and its asking a judge to limit the scope of the Stull's lawsuit.

WJAC asked the Stull's attorney, Bradley Tupi, whether it's possible the entire case could be thrown out. Tupi said a judge won't dismiss the case, but one or two counts against Gamesa and Allegheny Wind could be dismissed.

Tupi said a judge was supposed to rule on the case a few weeks ago. There is no word on why a decision has been delayed.


Source: http://www.wjactv.com/news/...

NOV 26 2008
http://www.windaction.org/posts/18084-portage-couple-awaiting-court-decision-on-turbine-lawsuit
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