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New controversy over wind turbines bid

In July Ecotricity was granted planning consent by just one vote to install the turbines at the Hethel track, despite strong objections from families who claimed the three 120 metre high turbines would blight the community. At that time the issue of whether the turbines would need aviation warning lights was raised and the committee was informed neither the MoD or Norwich International Airport had requested such lights. But since permission was granted, the MoD has revised its policies and wants to see one aviation warning light on each turbine.

Fresh controversy has flared up around the installation of three wind turbines at the old test track at Lotus - because the Ministry of Defence says warning lights must be added to them to stop planes from flying into them.

In July Ecotricity was granted planning consent by just one vote to install the turbines at the Hethel track, despite strong objections from families who claimed the three 120 metre high turbines would blight the community.

At that time the issue of whether the turbines would need aviation warning lights was raised and the committee was informed neither the MoD or Norwich International Airport had requested such lights.

But since permission was granted, the MoD has revised its policies and wants to see one aviation warning light on each turbine, which means a new application has been made to South Norfolk Council for permission to install those lights.

Bracon Ash and Hethel Parish Council has objected, saying the lights will be seen for many miles and the movement of the blades will create a "stroboscopic effect".

Furthermore, it said that there were... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Fresh controversy has flared up around the installation of three wind turbines at the old test track at Lotus - because the Ministry of Defence says warning lights must be added to them to stop planes from flying into them.

In July Ecotricity was granted planning consent by just one vote to install the turbines at the Hethel track, despite strong objections from families who claimed the three 120 metre high turbines would blight the community.

At that time the issue of whether the turbines would need aviation warning lights was raised and the committee was informed neither the MoD or Norwich International Airport had requested such lights.

But since permission was granted, the MoD has revised its policies and wants to see one aviation warning light on each turbine, which means a new application has been made to South Norfolk Council for permission to install those lights.

Bracon Ash and Hethel Parish Council has objected, saying the lights will be seen for many miles and the movement of the blades will create a "stroboscopic effect".

Furthermore, it said that there were "huge unanswered questions" about the project.

Colin Rudd, chairman of the parish council, said: "Putting lights at this height when you have rotating blades will be disturbing and these lights will be seen for miles and miles.

"This question was asked at every single planning meet but we were told lights were not needed and at the last minute they have changed their minds.

"This again has brought the matter to the forefront of people's minds and there are other issues we think have not been properly addressed."

The other issues included the effect the wind turbines will have on people's television signals and health and safety, especially in light of some recent reports.

In July this year, it was reported that the East Kilbride area, in Scotland, was in the midst of a television blackout as thousands of residents struggled to tune in because of a wind farm as far as 10 miles away.

Meanwhile, a huge propeller broke off a 190ft turbine close to a busy motorway link road in Sheffield after the 30ft blade cracked when the turbine was hit by strong gusts of wind. Elsewhere, Manchester City Football Club has stalled plans for its 360ft turbine due to health and safety fear.

East Carleton and Ketteringham Parish Council also want the lights to be refused, saying they would contravene lighting policies which say lighting should be kept to a minimum.

Eight people living nearby have sent letters objecting to the move while the Campaign for the Preservation of Rural England (Norfolk) says the area is classified as Rural Dark Landscape and that should not be lost.

However, officers at South Norfolk Council are recommending that members of the planning committee grant permission for the lights when they meet on Wednesday.

The officers say the lights will produce significantly less illumination than those on the masts at Tacolneston, near Poringland and accord with the lighting policy.

The report says: "The low strength of the lighting means that they will not be detrimental to the amenities of any nearby residential properties. It is not considered that static (constant red) lights of this strength will have a highway impact."

The turbines should become operational during 2009 and Ecotricity says they should supply all the electricity needed by Lotus on site without any pollution plus enough "spare" electricity to power about 1,000 homes in a typical year.


Source: http://www.eveningnews24.co...

NOV 8 2008
http://www.windaction.org/posts/17813-new-controversy-over-wind-turbines-bid
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