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$1.2B wind plan set; Projects aim to build 310 turbines by 2011

Wind power developer Higher Perpetual Energy and turbine manufacturer DeWind are on their way to spending about $1.2 billion to boost wind energy in the Panhandle. The plan is for a total of 310 turbines across the region in three years. The pair are finishing two small wind farms, with two larger ones on the drawing board. "The small ones will be very profitable," said David Tatton, president of Higher Perpetual Energy. "But they are also test projects for the teams working together."

Wind power developer Higher Perpetual Energy and turbine manufacturer DeWind are on their way to spending about $1.2 billion to boost wind energy in the Panhandle.

The plan is for a total of 310 turbines across the region in three years. The pair are finishing two small wind farms, with two larger ones on the drawing board.

"The small ones will be very profitable," said David Tatton, president of Higher Perpetual Energy. "But they are also test projects for the teams working together."

Higher Perpetual Energy is itself a joint venture of Higher Power and Perpetual Energy. Higher Power Energy is a U.S. development business started by Mark Patkunas four years ago.

Perpetual Energy is a British company that invests in projects and helps with the late stages of development in ventures across Europe and the U.S.

The small projects, called Little Pringle One and Two, are two 10-megawatt installations in the northern Panhandle.

The larger ones are Big Pringle, to be rated at 200 megawatts, and Palo Duro, west of the canyon with the same name, to be rated at 400 megawatts.

The largest wind operation in the Panhandle now is the Wildorado Wind Ranch, which is rated at 161 megawatts.

A megawatt... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Wind power developer Higher Perpetual Energy and turbine manufacturer DeWind are on their way to spending about $1.2 billion to boost wind energy in the Panhandle.

The plan is for a total of 310 turbines across the region in three years. The pair are finishing two small wind farms, with two larger ones on the drawing board.

"The small ones will be very profitable," said David Tatton, president of Higher Perpetual Energy. "But they are also test projects for the teams working together."

Higher Perpetual Energy is itself a joint venture of Higher Power and Perpetual Energy. Higher Power Energy is a U.S. development business started by Mark Patkunas four years ago.

Perpetual Energy is a British company that invests in projects and helps with the late stages of development in ventures across Europe and the U.S.

The small projects, called Little Pringle One and Two, are two 10-megawatt installations in the northern Panhandle.

The larger ones are Big Pringle, to be rated at 200 megawatts, and Palo Duro, west of the canyon with the same name, to be rated at 400 megawatts.

The largest wind operation in the Panhandle now is the Wildorado Wind Ranch, which is rated at 161 megawatts.

A megawatt can power about 350 average homes.

The two projects under construction will cover about 1,500 acres combined, Tatton said. Big Pringle will cover about 10,000 acres, and Palo Duro will stretch over about 25,000 acres.

"They should all be built by 2011," said Patkunas, chief executive officer of Higher Power Energy.

Higher Perpetual Energy will sell the electricity from Little Pringle One and Two to Xcel Energy. The market for the next two projects is less clear.

"In the next two to three months we'll formalize the other sales," Tatton said.

There is a bit of mystery surrounding the larger projects. The lack of major transmission lines for wind power from the Panhandle to population centers has limited development of project this size. While the Texas Public Utilities Commission is working on changing that, the process is far from over with negotiations and arguments before an administrative law judge to decide which companies will build transmission lines to West Texas.

"That's been a major constraint," Patkunas said. "That's something our engineers have been sorting out."

The men declined to discuss details but said their projects would not have to wait for the commission's process to be complete.

"We may establish a bit of a change in approach for transmission in the Panhandle," Tatton said.


Source: http://www.amarillo.com/sto...

OCT 25 2008
http://www.windaction.org/posts/17638-1-2b-wind-plan-set-projects-aim-to-build-310-turbines-by-2011
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