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Whole state has stake in Delmarva-Bluewater deadline negotiations

Reports coming out of Dover hold that the two sides in the great battle of the offshore wind farm are negotiating. Where they will lead, we don't know. ...The legislators passed a law directing Delmarva Power to find a reliable local source of electrical power and ended up with that, plus an almost religious battle over offshore wind power. Delmarva opposed this setup from the beginning. And never too far away is the spectre of a long legal fight that could delay action even longer. ...Listening to the radio advertisements put out by both sides is like going on a roller coaster ride. True believers on either side of the fight have no trouble finding the truth, but everyone left in the middle is dizzy and slightly sick to the stomach.

Reports coming out of Dover hold that the two sides in the great battle of the offshore wind farm are negotiating. Where they will lead, we don't know.

The limited number of days left for the legislature to meet in this session and decide on this issue adds even more pressure.

Negotiation, almost by its definition, means each side gives up something so that the conflict can be resolved. Whether or what Bluewater Wind will give something up is a good question. The same can be said about Delmarva Power.

Here are two entities, owned by corporate giants with a lot of money on the table. At stake is the future of energy supply in the state and the quality of the environment in the region. Do the four anointed agencies of the Delaware government vote in favor the Bluewater proposal or do they reject it?

Supervising the whole matter now, but in an informal way, are leaders of the General Assembly. The appropriateness of that development is questionable, considering that it was the Legislature that created the mess. The legislators passed a law directing Delmarva Power to find a reliable local source of electrical power and ended up with that, plus an almost... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Reports coming out of Dover hold that the two sides in the great battle of the offshore wind farm are negotiating. Where they will lead, we don't know.

The limited number of days left for the legislature to meet in this session and decide on this issue adds even more pressure.

Negotiation, almost by its definition, means each side gives up something so that the conflict can be resolved. Whether or what Bluewater Wind will give something up is a good question. The same can be said about Delmarva Power.

Here are two entities, owned by corporate giants with a lot of money on the table. At stake is the future of energy supply in the state and the quality of the environment in the region. Do the four anointed agencies of the Delaware government vote in favor the Bluewater proposal or do they reject it?

Supervising the whole matter now, but in an informal way, are leaders of the General Assembly. The appropriateness of that development is questionable, considering that it was the Legislature that created the mess. The legislators passed a law directing Delmarva Power to find a reliable local source of electrical power and ended up with that, plus an almost religious battle over offshore wind power. Delmarva opposed this setup from the beginning. And never too far away is the spectre of a long legal fight that could delay action even longer.

Caught in the middle are Delmarva's customers, the rate payers who will have to foot the bill and breathe the air other power plants produce. Many of them are absolutely, 100 percent behind the Bluewater proposal to build 317 wind turbines in the ocean off the coast of Delaware. They want wind power. Many others are opposed to it because the current proposal will cost more than other anticipated renewable power sources.

Listening to the radio advertisements put out by both sides is like going on a roller coaster ride. True believers on either side of the fight have no trouble finding the truth, but everyone left in the middle is dizzy and slightly sick to the stomach.

It's impossible to predict from the outside what will come of the current negotiations.

But since the General Assembly produced this particular legislation two years ago, many Delawareans have realized the great potential of offshore wind. Many others have recognized that joining with New Jersey and Maryland to develop bigger wind farms would overcome objections about the current proposal's costs and provide us with a source of clean energy.That is the direction the debate should turn. It will -- someday. But for now we wait on negotiations.


Source: http://www.delawareonline.c...

JUN 7 2008
http://www.windaction.org/posts/15384-whole-state-has-stake-in-delmarva-bluewater-deadline-negotiations
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