Article

Windmill documents available to public

LEWISBURG — If you can’t decide whether wind turbines are an abomination on the land or an answer to rising energy costs, you can now thumb through 340 pages of the siting application submitted to the Public Service Commission by Chicago-based Invenergy.

The proposed 125 turbine windmill farm application shows, among other topics, viewshed analysis, noise shed readings, maps and possible environmental impacts expected from the $300 million northwestern Greenbrier County project called Beech Ridge Wind Farm.

In January, the PSC ordered Beech Ridge to disseminate its application in seven different communities. These documents can now be found at the county clerks office at the courthouses in Greenbrier and Nicholas counties and town halls in Rupert, Rainelle, Renick and Richwood.

A seventh location, decided by the anti-wind farm group Mountain Communities for Responsible Energy, will be the Williamsburg Post Office.

“This information is being provided in the same spirit as the public meetings we held on this project in Greenbrier county,” Beech Ridge project manager Erik Duncan said.

“Placing these documents within the local communities will allow people to review extensive environmental and technical. The better informed they are, the more likely they are to clearly see the importance this project has on our national energy demands as well as the local economy.”

The PSC also announced last month a series of public hearings to... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
The proposed 125 turbine windmill farm application shows, among other topics, viewshed analysis, noise shed readings, maps and possible environmental impacts expected from the $300 million northwestern Greenbrier County project called Beech Ridge Wind Farm.

In January, the PSC ordered Beech Ridge to disseminate its application in seven different communities. These documents can now be found at the county clerks office at the courthouses in Greenbrier and Nicholas counties and town halls in Rupert, Rainelle, Renick and Richwood.

A seventh location, decided by the anti-wind farm group Mountain Communities for Responsible Energy, will be the Williamsburg Post Office.

“This information is being provided in the same spirit as the public meetings we held on this project in Greenbrier county,” Beech Ridge project manager Erik Duncan said.

“Placing these documents within the local communities will allow people to review extensive environmental and technical. The better informed they are, the more likely they are to clearly see the importance this project has on our national energy demands as well as the local economy.”

The PSC also announced last month a series of public hearings to be held on the proposed 186-megawatt windmill farm. The first will be held April 25 at the West Virginia State Fairgrounds in Greenbrier County; the others will be May 10-12 in Charleston. The PSC must render a decision on whether to grant Beech Ridge the go ahead before Aug. 28.

Beech Ridge has placed three-quarter page advertisements in two local newspapers in Greenbrier County which say the project will “satisfy the electricity demands of 50,000 households and make Greenbrier County a center of innovation n the energy industry.”

The ads also ask the public to write to the PSC in support of the project while touting the jobs and tax dollars which will be created for the county. A large picture shows what appears to be a child doing a cartwheel in the foreground and a windmill in the background with the heading: “It’s their turn ... for a cleaner tomorrow.”

MCRE media coordinator Dave Buhrman took umbrage at the ad, saying the scale of the child to the windmill is deceiving.

“It minimizes how large a windmill really is and they are trying to be slick with having a child in the ad,” he said, adding a windmill is 100 times larger than a person.

“Just think of a quarter sitting at the foot of a person. That’s the true scale of a 400-foot turbine.”

Source: http://www.register-herald....

FEB 22 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/1439-windmill-documents-available-to-public
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