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Examine numbers before agreeing to wind turbines

That’s about 20 percent of your electric bill coming back to Invenergy in the form of tax credit from your federal tax dollars.

Will we the citizens of Monroe County benefit from the development of a commercial wind farm? Are we aware of long-term health and safety issues? What we do know are some of the numbers provided by Invenergy.
Thoughts on the numbers given to us by Invenergy regarding monies and their distribution:

The cost of wholesale electricity from the wind turbines to their buyers is $54 per megawatt (a thousand-kilowatt hours). From the purchaser Invenergy receives 3.5 cents per kilowatt-hour and 1.9 cents per kilowatt-hour from the federal government as a federal tax credit, your tax dollars. Thus they are receiving 5.4 cents per kilowatt-hour or $54 per megawatt.

With a typical home using a 1000 kilowatt (kwh), or about a $100 electric bill, $19 of that $100.00 is your federal tax dollars coming back to Invenergy in the form of production tax credit (PTC).

That’s about 20 percent of your electric bill coming back to Invenergy in the form of tax credit from your federal tax dollars.

Each wind turbine is expected to supply about 500 homes with their electric needs. Five hundred homes at $19 in production tax credit equals $9,500 per month per turbine or about $114,000 per year of your... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
Will we the citizens of Monroe County benefit from the development of a commercial wind farm? Are we aware of long-term health and safety issues? What we do know are some of the numbers provided by Invenergy.
  
Thoughts on the numbers given to us by Invenergy regarding monies and their distribution:

The cost of wholesale electricity from the wind turbines to their buyers is $54 per megawatt (a thousand-kilowatt hours). From the purchaser Invenergy receives 3.5 cents per kilowatt-hour and 1.9 cents per kilowatt-hour from the federal government as a federal tax credit, your tax dollars. Thus they are receiving 5.4 cents per kilowatt-hour or $54 per megawatt.

With a typical home using a 1000 kilowatt (kwh), or about a $100 electric bill, $19 of that $100.00 is your federal tax dollars coming back to Invenergy in the form of production tax credit (PTC).

That’s about 20 percent of your electric bill coming back to Invenergy in the form of tax credit from your federal tax dollars.

Each wind turbine is expected to supply about 500 homes with their electric needs. Five hundred homes at $19 in production tax credit equals $9,500 per month per turbine or about $114,000 per year of your federal tax dollars. Of those monies, $4,000 will come back to the host landowner and $6,000 will come back to your local and county government, mandated by the state. This is your federal tax dollars in the form of credits.

Each turbine supplying 500 homes will generate at $54 per megawatt approximately $324,000 per year. A project with 50 wind turbines will generate over 16 million dollars per year. The 50 hosts will receive a total of $200,000, and local governments will receive approximately $300,000 dollars per year. How much of the balance of 16 million dollars will be spent in this county?

With each turbine and related infrastructure costs, approximately $2 million per turbine in a payoff projected at 8 to 10 years; I personally wouldn’t let someone pay for this type of investment, harvesting wind off my farm for $4,000 a year.

With a 2 percent increase per year over a 40 years period, given inflation at typically 3 percent, 50 percent of the revenue will be lost over contract life. Also, given the fact that my energy costs have gone up 50 percent in just five years would make one wonder where all those additional revenues are going.

Real estate brokers and appraisers have assured many of us that property values will decrease. Arguments have been made that studies will show assessors have shown no significant devaluation of property values. According to Tony Kiel, assessor Town of Ridgeville, an assessor would need a three- to five-year period to make a land value judgment. I suggest talking to a real estate broker or appraiser to get your answer now.

As we know, we need to develop alternate energy resources so we can be less dependent on the Middle East. There are many alternative energies including wind that need to be evaluated. If the county and the towns want to lean toward green energy development, perhaps an ethanol plant would better serve our needs. We would develop local jobs and provide a market for hundreds of local farmers. That in itself may paint a rosier balance sheet for the county than Invenergy from Chicago will.

What we should do as a county is take into consideration other choices before developing a wind farm that will encompass an area nearly the size of Fort McCoy. As a member of the study committee, I and many others encountered new issues each and every time we met. Other counties having problems with wind farms have provided these issues.

They need to be addressed. It’s time we sought outside professional help to evaluate both the economic and long-term health and safety effects that the development of a commercial wind farm will have on the citizens of this county.

Source: http://www.tomahjournal.com...

FEB 6 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/1211-examine-numbers-before-agreeing-to-wind-turbines
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