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Alternative energy will benefit state, leader says

Gov. Kathleen Sebelius' administration Thursday was in damage control mode over its decision to reject two massive coal-fired plants in western Kansas. In a speech to a Rotary Club in Topeka, Lt. Gov. Mark Parkinson repeatedly emphasized development of alternative energy projects in western Kansas, and the accompanying economic activity. ..."I think they are trying to create a vision that things are all perfect," said Kreutzer, a plumbing and mechanical supply contractor. But, he said, denial of the coal-fired plants has chased off a lot of potential development in the region. And Sebelius' refusal to allow the plants to be constructed has produced a potential political standoff, he said.

Gov. Kathleen Sebelius' administration Thursday was in damage control mode over its decision to reject two massive coal-fired plants in western Kansas.

In a speech to a Rotary Club in Topeka, Lt. Gov. Mark Parkinson repeatedly emphasized development of alternative energy projects in western Kansas, and the accompanying economic activity.

Later, Parkinson told reporters that western Kansas' glass was "overflowing."

He added, "The future of western Kansas in terms of energy is incredibly bright, but it's in alternative energy that we have in western Kansas. It's not in buying coal from Wyoming."

Officials from western Kansas have been in an uproar since last month when the Sebelius administration denied permits for the two 700-megawatt plants near Holcomb, which would have been powered by coal purchased in Wyoming.

Kansas Department of Health and Environment Secretary Roderick Bremby rejected the permits, citing concerns about the proposed plants' carbon dioxide emissions and global warming.

Parkinson, in his speech Thursday, talked about the increase in wind-generated power and construction of ethanol plants as an alternative fuel. He said much of this... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Gov. Kathleen Sebelius' administration Thursday was in damage control mode over its decision to reject two massive coal-fired plants in western Kansas.

In a speech to a Rotary Club in Topeka, Lt. Gov. Mark Parkinson repeatedly emphasized development of alternative energy projects in western Kansas, and the accompanying economic activity.

Later, Parkinson told reporters that western Kansas' glass was "overflowing."

He added, "The future of western Kansas in terms of energy is incredibly bright, but it's in alternative energy that we have in western Kansas. It's not in buying coal from Wyoming."

Officials from western Kansas have been in an uproar since last month when the Sebelius administration denied permits for the two 700-megawatt plants near Holcomb, which would have been powered by coal purchased in Wyoming.

Kansas Department of Health and Environment Secretary Roderick Bremby rejected the permits, citing concerns about the proposed plants' carbon dioxide emissions and global warming.

Parkinson, in his speech Thursday, talked about the increase in wind-generated power and construction of ethanol plants as an alternative fuel. He said much of this development was suited for western Kansas, which produces the crops to make ethanol and has among the most viable wind farm locations in the country.

His comments came a day after Bremby used the approval of an ethanol plant in Dodge City to tout the benefits to western Kansas of the developing ethanol industry.

But Bob Kreutzer, of Garden City, who is a supporter of the Holcomb plants, said the assurances from Bremby and Parkinson rang hollow.

"I think they are trying to create a vision that things are all perfect," said Kreutzer, a plumbing and mechanical supply contractor.

But, he said, denial of the coal-fired plants has chased off a lot of potential development in the region.

And Sebelius' refusal to allow the plants to be constructed has produced a potential political standoff, he said.

"If she continues this way, it is going to tear this state apart by the time this litigation is over," he said.

The plant developer, Sunflower Electric Power Corp., has vowed to fight KDHE's decision in court. And western Kansas lawmakers, including House Speaker Melvin Neufeld, R-Ingalls, and Senate President Steve Morris, R-Hugoton, have said they are considering legislation aimed at reversing Bremby's ruling.


Source: http://www2.ljworld.com/new...

NOV 16 2007
http://www.windaction.org/posts/11932-alternative-energy-will-benefit-state-leader-says
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