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Contested Wind Farm

Despite an ongoing court challenge, developers expect to connect the NedPower Mount Storm wind farm to the state's power grid by this fall. NedPower's Dave Myers says turbines will begin producing power as they're hooked up one at a time come October. Right now, he says, developers are putting up 300-foot towers, installing equipment and doing other work on 82 turbines. Shipments of the turbine's 150-foot blades are expected to begin soon.

Despite an ongoing court challenge, developers expect to connect the NedPower Mount Storm wind farm to the state's power grid by this fall.

NedPower's Dave Myers says turbines will begin producing power as they're hooked up one at a time come October. Right now, he says, developers are putting up 300-foot towers, installing equipment and doing other work on 82 turbines. Shipments of the turbine's 150-foot blades are expected to begin soon.

NedPower and Shell Windenergy, which will buy the Grant County farm once it's finished, plan to put up 200 turbines eventually. But Myers says construction of the rest won't start until developers wrap up right of way negotiations with land owners.

The $300 million project still faces a potentially significant problem. In June, the state Supreme Court reinstated a lawsuit challenging the farm. The plaintiffs, a group of homeowners who live near the wind farm in the Grassy Ridge area, contend their property values will plunge if the string of turbines is completed.


Despite an ongoing court challenge, developers expect to connect the NedPower Mount Storm wind farm to the state's power grid by this fall.

NedPower's Dave Myers says turbines will begin producing power as they're hooked up one at a time come October. Right now, he says, developers are putting up 300-foot towers, installing equipment and doing other work on 82 turbines. Shipments of the turbine's 150-foot blades are expected to begin soon.

NedPower and Shell Windenergy, which will buy the Grant County farm once it's finished, plan to put up 200 turbines eventually. But Myers says construction of the rest won't start until developers wrap up right of way negotiations with land owners.

The $300 million project still faces a potentially significant problem. In June, the state Supreme Court reinstated a lawsuit challenging the farm. The plaintiffs, a group of homeowners who live near the wind farm in the Grassy Ridge area, contend their property values will plunge if the string of turbines is completed.



Source: http://www.whsv.com/westvir...

JUL 26 2007
http://www.windaction.org/posts/10261-contested-wind-farm
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